The next generation of autonomous systems will operate in crowded environments filled with manned and unmanned vehicles. The required level of autonomy poses a range of technical and regulatory challenges beyond the current engineering state-of-the-art, and is an active area of research in academic, corporate, and government laboratories.

The growth of the autonomous-systems industry is driving a need for educating and training a research-capable work force. Ongoing areas of autonomous unmanned systems research involve individual vehicle capabilities for sensing and control, as well as how groups of vehicles cooperate with one another without human intervention.

Basic Research Challenges in autonomous unmanned systems engaged by this stream:

  • Autonomous systems reliability
  • Guidelines for ethical autonomy
  • Autonomous system verification & validation
  • Platform-level sense & avoid capabilities
  • Cooperative control of multiple autonomous vehicles
  • Managing the interaction between humans and autonomous systems

  • First-Year Spring Semester Course:
    FIRE164 - FIRE SEMESTER 2: Autonomous Unmanned Systems
    (3 credits, General Education Distributive Studies, Natural Sciences)
    Second-Year Fall Semester Course:
    FIRE264 - FIRE SEMESTER 3: Autonomous Unmanned Systems
    (3 credits, General Education Scholarship in Practice)

    2017 Autonomous Unmanned Systems Innovation & Research Stream

    2016 Autonomous Unmanned Systems Innovation & Research Stream

    Faculty Leader
    Dr. Derek Paley

    Research Educator
    Dr. Derrick Yeo